Copywriting Blog

With the recent launch of Google Glass here in the UK, many people have been asking how they can start monetising apps for the device. In the last month, Google announced that many of its devices would start getting the ad treatment, from the Glass platform all the way to the smart thermostat, Nest. Advertisements have even been slated for the latest in-car technology, with Google’s self-driving car open to placements too. This is a fairly logical step as Google is an ad-driven company, but many of the products aren’t implementing these options any time soon, with Glass being one of them. That hasn’t stopped many companies from experimenting with future apps for the device. With companies such as Blippar, an app that brings such things as magazines and cereal boxes to life when the phone’s camera is pointed at them, experimenting with Glass, Google might bow to the pressure sooner rather than...

Social networking site Facebook went offline for many users around the world this morning, albeit for a brief 15 minute spell. Many countries have been affected, including: Hong Kong, Thailand, Japan, Holland and Australia. The downtime has drawn massive attention from Twitter and other social media platforms, with many users expressing their comedic dismay. The second most popular site on the internet is back up and running now, but let’s hope that this is a rare occurrence, especially as the crash also knocked all Facebook’s apps offline, including the new Slingshot app. Launched earlier this week, Slingshot is taking aim at the image sharing app Snapchat, boasting some seemingly similar features. This has been seen by many as a retaliatory move after the owners of Snapchat refused the $3 billion buyout proposal offered by Facebook late last year. The social networking site has so far not commented on the outage....

Twitter is one of the most effective ways to speak directly to consumers, but it can go wrong. Spectacularly wrong in some cases. Here are a few things to avoid when thinking about a Twitter campaign: Jumping on the bandwagon When a major event happens, it can be easy to go with the crowd and tenuously link your brand to anything that is making the news or trending. A supportive message is one thing, but followers can quickly turn on companies trying to shamelessly flog their products. Look at this tweet from Charmin, the toilet paper brand: Your target audience sees right through this kind of thing, and will only be detrimental to your brand image, so refrain at all costs. Using tragedies to promote Arguably the worst thing a brand can do is try and gain coverage through a tragic news story. Many companies have done this in the past, leading to backlashes from hundreds,...

As I am sure you are aware, the hopes and dreams of many of the world’s nations are weighing heavy on the football players fighting it out halfway around the planet. Beyond the visual spectacular that will no doubt be the 2014 World Cup Finals in Brazil, there are some alarming facts that underlie the beautiful game. We have selected a few of the most shocking disparities between some of the country’s top players and their fellow countrymen, alongside some of the lesser known facts from behind the scenes at the host nation’s preparation, and constructed the infographic below. ...

Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia, expressed his doubts regarding the recent EU Right to be Forgotten ruling during his appearance on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show on Sunday. The ruling states that any individual has the right to apply to Google to remove search result information that may be “irrelevant, outdated, or otherwise inappropriate”. Wales, who is an adviser on a panel at Google concerning privacy, said the ruling was “not workable”, mainly because of the internet's inherent global make-up. So for example, if something is censored in the EU, it won’t be censored in the US. Furthermore, other search engines have not been restricted in the same way. He also expressed his shock at how broad the ruling was and his concerns over the type of data that could be taken down. When asked about the cost to internet companies and the inevitable rise in legal cases, he responded with warnings...

Last week, Facebook unveiled its new 'Ask' button, a feature that allows people to ask Facebook friends about their current relationship status. Many users are confused by what Facebook's aims are with this new feature. Are they starting a dating site? Is it a way of getting people to keep their profiles up to date? And what does it mean for us marketers? The obvious answer is more data for advertising. Facebook is increasingly reliant on providing accurate, hyper-targeting for its advertising model to work and attract new clients. Facebook still offers the most detailed targeting of any online platform for advertisers and it needs to ensure its data is kept fresh as possible. And what better way to do this but by giving the job to its own network? So rather than Facebook prompting you to give more personal information, its using our friends to do it, knowing that most people are...

Currently, once information goes online, it never really dies. This might not be the case for much longer though. As we all know, Google, along with other search engines, is extremely effective in displaying the most relevant results for what you're looking for, and because a ‘cache’ is being used, the data can still be accessed and viewed even when the website holding the information is taken offline. A great illustration of this is what happened to Spaniard, Mario Costeja Gonzalez. Over sixteen years ago, during some financial difficulties, he decided to put his property up for auction. Details of the auction were covered by a newspaper, which then subsequently went online. Today, although his financial worries are behind him, Google still displays the news about the auction whenever someone searches his name. In order to solve this problem, which as he described, “continues to damage his reputation and infringes his privacy”, Mario...

Google has released fascinating research into UK YouTube users for the very first time. In an attempt to disprove the stereotype that YouTube users are young, antisocial and not prepared to pay for their content, Google commissioned Ipsos MediaCT to survey 1,583 people in the UK. 74% of the study group were YouTube users and were spread across the 13-64 age group. The results show that 39% watch YouTube content with their partner and 48% of users are connected to more than 100 people on social networks, shifting the perception of an avid YouTube fan as someone who watches content alone. YouTube users are also twice as likely to buy movies and book digitally, than those who don't use YouTube. 89% of YouTube users use the internet everyday, while the most popular content is music followed by comedy and DIY how-to videos. YouTube users watch less TV that non-YouTube users and view TV...

According to a report by the Financial Times, Facebook are planning on launching new financial services for European users in the “next few weeks”. In a move to turn itself into an 'e-money' institution, Facebook are planning on allowing users to store money on the site and then use it to pay and exchange with other users. The company is currently obtaining regulatory approval from authorities in Ireland, which will allow Facebook to offer electronic financial services, including remittances. It is keen to allow users to transfer e-money via the network using a process called 'passporting'. They have already held talks with three London start-ups that provide international money transfer services online and via smartphones. These include TransferWise, Moni Technologies and Azimo. Facebook have previously experimented with e-commerce through the development of Facebook Credits, which could be used to pay for virtual goods on the platform, but it failed to gain traction with...

Most industries have now cottoned on to the idea that content marketing is essential for driving success in today's digital world. As Content Marketing Institute research shows, engaging content encourages brand loyalty, increases organic search traffic and reduces the cost of generating leads. Interesting content is a top 3 reason for people following a brand on social media, whilst inbound marketing leads cost less than half that of an outbound marketing lead. But what's really interesting is the way 'boring' industries are capitalising on content marketing, in many cases putting 'cooler', more fun brands to shame. In many ways this has come about through necessity. Faced with a hugely competitive market place, financial and insurance companies have had to think of imaginative ways to generate cheaper leads, focusing on SEO rather than PPC for web traffic. And as such, they can seem a step ahead of some more traditionally content-friendly brands. Here...