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Have you been looking for a clear and concise way to outline your consumer journey? Let us introduce the content marketing funnel.

Studies show that 60% of people are inspired to seek out a product after reading content. With so many brands producing content regularly, the way to stand out lies in planning and organisation.

Content marketing funnels are the perfect way to plan which content is best to distribute at different stages in the buyer journey. By understanding your demographic’s micro-moments you are able to develop a clear strategy in how best to reach the buyer at different stages.

Here’s how to make your forward planning hassle-free…

What is AIDA? 

AIDA is a marketing formula that outlines the consumer journey and inspires action – it stands for Attention Interest Desire Action.

With 84% of people expecting brands to create content, gone are the days of a quick sale and in comes the need for more information. People are now looking to be educated when they head to specific pages which is why AIDA proves useful.

To meet this demand, it is vital for business to have a content marketing funnel in order to know which types of content is best. The AIDA formula is the perfect guideline for brands wanting to achieve higher profit.

Attention

With more than 4 billion people online, brands are using content to achieve the top spot – the key is knowing how to grab your audience’s attention.

Initial planning and research is vital to make sure your brand creates content types that are of interest. This is the time to discover who your audience is, what their interests are and which terms or phrases they are more likely to search for online. Creating a buying persona is a great way to have a clear understanding of your targeted demographic.

Once you have created the perfect consumer profile, it is now time to think about the kind of things they will be interested in searching for. If you’re reaching out to food lovers, it’s key to know the words or languages they will use; terms such as ‘foodies’ and ‘new recipes’ in your food copywriting to catch their attention. Make sure that your content also discusses topics that are useful to them.

Types of content:

Interest

The average visitor only reads 25% of an article, which means that your headline and intro paragraph must contain key phrases to convince audiences to read on.

A key step to keeping page visitors interested is by showing that your brand not only understands their need but provides a solution. The goal of this step is so that brands can position themselves as industry experts and become a go-to source of information for their audience.

Always use and reference credible sources when writing these pieces. 78% of people now place emphasis on the trustworthiness of a source, so by linking to well-known industry influencers, consumers will also trust your brand and be more likely to use it.

Types of content:

Desire

Did you know that content marketing generates more than three times as many leads as outbound marketing and costs 62% less? Going hand-in-hand with interest, this phase is about converting those all-important leads into sales.

Now that you’ve managed to keep the consumer’s attention, it’s time to show off what makes your brand irresistible. Some key questions that should be answered is why should consumers use your brand, why they need the product or service being provided, and how they can receive it.

Make sure the final stages of the buying process are as clear as possible. At this stage, consumers are interested in the product, so use this to your advantage – all content should be aimed at turning their desire into a positive decision.

Types of content:

Action

Never underestimate the power of a call to action.

In the final stages of the content marketing funnel, it is now about closing the deal and getting the sale. By using a simple but bold message, such as ‘book now’ or ‘buy your item’, it guides users as to what to do next.

Every piece of content should have a clear call to action. A top tip is to revisit early research on the terms or phrases used by your demographic. By using these, you can further build the relationship between your brand and the individual. Another way to create the perfect call to action is by personalising them to each consumer. Based on their online habits, personalised buttons can be shown to them.

Finally, think about anything that would deter a user from choosing your brand. If you think they will have issues with spending – add a guarantee, and if they have questions about privacy, have a clear policy in place that they can read.

Types of content:

 

Content marketing funnels are a great way of helping brands grow, and ensuring your brand is thinking ahead when it comes to boosting sales. By pre-planning why specific content is being distributed, brands are able to lead consumers through the funnel to the final purchase.

If you’ve been looking for a way to add structure to your content marketing, AIDA is key to getting your funnel started.

Developing this formula for your brand isn’t always easy. If you need guidance, choose a copywriting agency that can contribute the right strategies. Once that’s done, you’ll be well on your way to targeting buyers and making them more likely to choose you.

I need of high-quality content strategy services to help capture and progress searchers down your sales funnel? Get in touch with our experts for advice or a personalised quote.

 

Related Content Marketing blog posts:

Content creation tools

How to create e-books that generate leads

Build Your Email Subscriber List With These Content Ideas

 

Content marketing is here to stay – it’s a proven strategy used by the world’s most successful marketing teams. Despite this, proving the value of your content to your bosses and peers is another task entirely. In theory, measuring the return of your content strategy sounds straightforward. You probably already have an idea whether it’s working or not. But how do you measure return on investment (ROI) in practice? Here are some of the best way of doing so.

Calculating ROI

In plain terms, to calculate ROI, subtract the spend from the return, then divide the return by the amount spent – in this example, our return is £20,000 and our spend is £10,000:

(£20,000 – £10,000) / £10,000 = 1.00

ROI = current value of investment minus cost of investment divided by cost of investment.

This will give you a decimal that can be expressed as a percentage (in this case, 100%). You’ll already know this but if it’s a positive number, well done, your activity drove more money than you spent. If it’s negative, it probably wasn’t worth the effort.

The underlying stats

The actual formula for ROI is relatively straightforward. Adding up how much you spend should also be simple, providing you have kept accurate records. Add up everything from time spent, salaries paid, agency fees, media spend, design costs and anything else you can think of for the most accurate reflection.

The most difficult part with content marketing is putting a figure on the return.

Lead generation

Identifying the return is easier for some types of content over others. If your content is behind a lead-generation form that requires users to enter their details before accessing the file, you’re in luck. Evaluating the amount of business it drove is as simple as matching the lead value to the downloads. It may be worth doing this with potential lead value (whether it was won or lost) and actual sales value. This way, you can prove the worth of your content – it’s up to the sales team to close the lead.

You can see this method in action with Hubspot’s Complete Collection of Content Creation Templates. If you want to download them, you have to tell Hubspot who you are, and you can bet they’ll get in contact afterwards. If your lead-generation form is connected to your customer database – like Hubspot’s will be – then this process is even more simple.

Alternative ways of evaluating return

For other types of content, it’s less straightforward. Blogs, videos, articles, guest posts, infographics, case studies and other pieces of content will all contribute to sales in various ways without getting that final conversion. To find the ROI for these, you’ll have to be more creative as there are many methods:

 

Attribution models in Google Analytics

There are many ways of attributing the value of sales you have made to the marketing efforts that drove them. It’s a complex journey, because users move between channels over a significant period of time before they make their purchase.

Google Analytics is a great free tool that is helpful when evaluating the return of content. Its Page Value metric puts a financial figure against each page based on the contribution it makes to sales. The higher the number, the higher the value.

The tool also allows you to look at your marketing performance using different attribution models, providing you have e-commerce tracking set up. There are the standard models: first click, last click, time decay and linear. There is also the option to create a custom model. It’s worth looking at your content using different models to see how and where it contributes, so you can optimise it.

Start simply

Evaluating the return from content marketing can be as complicated or simple as you like. Our advice is to start off small and grow from there. It’s better to have a baseline figure that everyone understands and gives you a starting point rather than spending time and energy on a more accurate figure that probably isn’t worth the effort. Once you’re confident, you can move towards an ROI value that is accurate and actionable.

Get in touch with WooContent today to discover how as a copywriting agency we can support your content marketing strategy.

Related Content Marketing blog posts: 

The content marketing funnel explained

Build Your Email Subscriber List With These Content Ideas

How to create e-books that generate leads

 

We’ve all experienced how some of the big household names in charity use hard-hitting subject matters and psychology to grab our attention.

In fact, as of September 2017 there were over 167,000 charities in the UK, each wanting to get their voices heard.

We explore charity copywriting methods including active voice, building connections and powerful call to actions (CTAs) in order to convert readers to donators. And, how excellent copywriting can inform and even save lives, while at the same time nudging readers towards allegiance with the charity and raising money.

How UNICEF leveraged its social influence

In 2013, the Swedish branch of UNICEF used a somewhat controversial message to encourage its large social media following to take action and donate. Its ‘Likes don’t save lives’ campaign highlighted the rise of ‘slacktivism’, saying ‘Like us on Facebook, and we will vaccinate zero children against polio.’

As well as these adverts, four video ads were also distributed through social media. One of the most powerful was a direct address to the camera from a 10-year-old orphan. The clever copywriting in the script used a sarcastic tone to get people thinking, with the boy saying:

“Sometimes I worry that I will get sick, like my mom got sick. But I think everything will be alright. Today, Unicef Sweden has 177,000 likes on Facebook.”

The result of UNICEF’s application of impactful psychological wording was a huge increase in donations. In fact the money raised was enough to vaccinate 637,324 people against polio. Likes alone can’t fund UNICEF’s work, but leveraging those likes with smart copywriting can.

Oxfam asks the underdogs to work together

The tagline of Oxfam’s ‘Even it up’ advert portrays an injustice that the everyday person can relate to, brought in the form of a heavyweight statistic:

‘The world’s 85 richest people own the same wealth as the 3.5 billion poorest people.’

This statistic draws on the readers’ knowledge of the wealth disparity in the UK – much touted in the press – while also putting it into perspective. That’s because the image portrays a child in a third world country wearing whatever clothes he can find, who is far worse off than the average Brit.

Readers are encouraged to visit Oxfam’s website through use of the inclusive wording ‘together, we can end extreme equality’ and ‘join us at www.oxfam.org.uk/even’. Once there, you’re asked to sign a petition that’ll be sent to world leaders, through the use of further astute copywriting.

After explaining Oxfam’s belief ‘that everyone should have a fair say, pay their fair share of tax, have equal access to good healthcare and education, and decent wages.’ The final CTA is a question that again signifies working together and implies that everyone else will be signing the petition: ‘The world is ready to act, are you? It’s time to Even it up!’

RNLI – saving lives and increasing engagement

For the fourth year of the RNLI’s ‘Respect the Water’ national drowning prevention campaign, the charity has launched cinema and radio ads, as well as cleverly worded and laid-out social ads that engage on a number of levels.

One of the slogans used in RNLI’s social media ads is:

‘Extend your arms, legs and life expectancy’

This succinctly and directly explains what to do if you fall in cold water. The wording shows how a simple action has a profound effect.

RNLI

@RNLI

Extend your arms, legs and life expectancy.

View image on Twitter
87 people are talking about this

Another tweet uses the acronym F.L.O.A.T. to give full instruction on what to do, in an easy to remember way.

RNLI

@RNLI

Fight your instinct and F.L.O.A.T to live.

View image on Twitter
70 people are talking about this

Using the overarching message ‘Float to live’, the copywriting primarily has the aim of informing and saving lives, rather than actively encouraging donations. However the ads promote understanding of the good work that the RNLI does, encourage social engagement through the hashtag #RespectTheWater and direct people to their website, where they can learn more and potentially donate.

The Respect The Water webpages contain videos, challenges and expert opinion, ending in the CTA ‘hear about our lifesaving work, keep in touch’. And when people hit keep in touch the orange donate button is looming in the top right.

Leaving legacies to The Donkey Sanctuary

In 2013 The Guardian released data on the top 1,000 charities in the UK ranked by donations received; and there were some surprising rankings. In fact, the Donkey Sanctuary received more donations than The Samaritans, which was due in large part to legacies.

So we took a look at the legacy pages on their website to see how they were encouraging people to leave money to the charity in their wills. Leaving a legacy is one of the four main ways of giving to The Donkey Sanctuary provided on their ‘ways to help’ page, in addition to various forms of donation. Incidentally, we also liked the way that the section was called ‘ways to help’, which is a far less pushy title than simply ‘donate’.

Headed with the words ‘Leave a lasting gift’, the main legacy page encourages action in a traditionally effective way – by flattering readers. It says:

So here’s to those who change the world.

The selfless devoted ones, the compassionate ones, those whose conviction protects the abused, the overworked, the unwanted and unloved.

The CTA on this page is a very direct ‘email us’, which works due to the effectiveness of the other pages in the legacy section, such as a ‘How to leave a legacy’ information page and a testimonial from a benefactor. The content on these pages allows the reader to make a firm decision about leaving a legacy while on the website.

As well as showing that others are leaving legacies to the Donkey Sanctuary, and thus encouraging donation through a feeling of inclusion, the wording on this testimonial page highlights that legacies of any amount are gratefully received:

I’ve decided to leave The Donkey Sanctuary a bequest in my Will. My family will come first, but then I’m planning to leave what’s left to charity.

However small my contribution, I am made to feel that ‘every little bit helps’.

It’s clear that charities can use a number of tactics such as using a financial copywriter to encourage people to donate. Knowing the way your potential supporters feel and how to persuade them to get involved is key in creating effective copywriting for charities.

As a copywriting agency, WooContent can offer advice on charity copywriting that leads to support, so get in touch today to find out more.

Related Charities Blog Posts: 

Harnessing the power of keywords in the charity sector

 

See if you can get through the next four sentences without a touch of discomfort:

“We strive to adhere to the latest industry standards for each piece of expert content it produces for its clients. We’re always chuffed to chat about concocting content that will go the whole nine yards. From multilingual to complex industry copy, we are ideally equipped to meet your requirements. Because if content is king, you could say we’re its white horse – delivering the goods at the right time, and always in style.”

What you’ve just witnessed is different tones of voice overlapping in the same space.

Without a consistent tone of voice, not only is this copy cringe-worthy, it’s almost completely ineffective. In this article, we’ll cover how you can define and craft a tone of voice for your brand to avoid the same fate.

What is a business’ tone of voice?

Tone of voice is, quite simply, how you say something. In real-life, we give peoples’ tones of voice descriptions like ‘condescending’, ‘sarcastic’, or ‘serious’ and our perception of their tone sets the stall for our relationship with them.

This principle transfers to the business world, but instead of saying words aloud, you’re writing them down. All of your written communication – from your website and emails to your packaging and social media messages – should reflect it.

No brand is toneless, though some may mesh several tones and confuse everyone (as we saw above). Because your tone can define how your business is viewed by consumers, it’s critical to develop a consistent one.

Why is crafting a tone of voice important?

It’s cliche, but people hate change.

Any ripple in our expectations causes discomfort, even if it’s subconscious. This affects how customers engage with your brand.

You’d want all of your stationery, email signatures, advertisements, company kit and website pages to show the correct logo and company name. You also want your copy to appear as if it’s come from one source.

Giving your brand this uniform ‘voice’ conveys trustworthiness, honesty and stability – traits that we, as humans, adore.

Just as you may define a certain friend as ‘funny’, a colleague as ‘enthusiastic’, or your boss as ‘frank’, your customers will see your brand’s tone of voice as an expression of you.

Innocent Drinks, for example, has long been making waves for their casual, conversational tone… just check out this product description:

Likewise, Dollar Shave Club infuses a healthy dose of humour into an otherwise bland product (men’s razors) to differentiate themselves from competitors.

For customers, not only does this build trust, it gives them something to identify with. It proves you’re not just the products you sell, you’re a company with values that line up with theirs.

Think of it in reverse order: if they buy into your personality, they’re more likely to buy into your ideas and eventually your products.

How to discover and define your brand’s tone of voice

Pull back the layers of your business and defining a tone of voice takes three relatively simple steps.

 1. Outline your company values

Much like creating a mission statement, your tone of voice spawns directly from your company values.

First, you need to identify what those are. A good starting point is to pretend your business is a person you’re taking to a dinner party. Ask yourself what they would be like. Then, ask your team what they would be like.

From here, your values will start to take shape. While it sounds bizarre, human traits communicated as company values are what will set you apart – try to define three key ones.

Examples of three values from a few major companies:
Nikebold, simple, active
HSBC: traditional, professional, approachable
MailChimp: cheeky, fun, young

Be careful not to pick general terms like ‘intelligent’ for your IT company, as intelligence is standard across every IT company. Focus on the traits that make you different.

More importantly, don’t fake it ’til you make it. If your company is not humorous, forcing it to sound so will be… well, forced. Consumers can see through try-too-hard copy and, in the age of social media, won’t think twice about calling you out on it.

Your brand does not have to be relaxed like Innocent or funny like Dollar Shave Club to be heard and appreciated. Trying to copy what works for another brand leaves your own identity hollow, and makes producing every piece of content harder for you.

Instead, talk – with and listen to – your colleagues and even your customers about the company. The words you use and how you converse is already shaping your tone of voice, you just need to be able to put that in writing.

2. Transform those values into vocabulary

After you’ve defined your three key values, you need to make some rules about how they will be communicated in writing.

Use a spectrum to get an idea of where you want to sit. From humorous to serious, formal to casual, or inspirational to straightforward, this will clue your copywriters and content creators in on where their pieces should rest.

Keep in mind who you will be writing for. If it’s other businesses, you may want a professional-yet-approachable tone, whereas if you’re customer-facing you may desire a fun-and-exciting voice.

Then, decide on your actual vocabulary.

Complexity: Consider if terms like ‘altruistic’ and ‘amicable’ or simpler vocabulary would suit your audience’s reading level.

Humour: If you’re treading the fine line of a humorous style, make sure it comes across as such to people outside the company.

No-go terms: What will your brand absolutely not say? For instance, travel companies might avoid cliches like ‘crystal clear waters’ or ‘something for everyone’.

Colloquialisms and technical jargon: Defining something as cheap-as-chips might work for some, while it may be too casual for others. The same goes for confusing industry terminology (in general, unnecessary terms are better left out).

Nitty gritty grammar: More formal writing may stray away from starting sentences with ‘and’ or ‘but’. Meanwhile, relaxed styles may want to avoid stuffy terms like ‘whom’ and ‘amongst.’ Conjunctions are another consideration: does your brand prefer ‘they’re’ or ‘they are’, ‘it’s’ or ‘it is’?

Punctuation: In a list, will you separate the second and third options with the Oxford comma? Are exclamation points strictly off limits? Does the full stop go inside or outside quotation marks? What type of dash will you –use long em dashes, medium en dashes, or two hyphens together?

Swearing: If you plan to allow swearing as part of your brand’s voice like Dollar Shave Club did in the product description example at the start of this article, it needs to match your values. If you’d define your brand as ‘rebellious’, then it probably works for you. If you swing more toward ‘cheerful’, it’s better to stay away.

3. Learn to tell your story

When the small details have been hammered out, it’s time to look big picture. Storytelling allows you to present information to your customers that resonates with them on an emotional level. Stories also lead readers from one point to the next, so they won’t get lost in waves of ideas.

While not appropriate in every situation, you’ll be surprised at how frequently a story can replace mundane text.

History of your company is a good place to start. Instead of writing a bland background, give it some life by telling a compelling story about the founder’s journey.

Or, find ways to tell everyday stories. For example, GoPro highlights the videos and stories of its everyday users.

Or create a sub-culture around doing things differently. The American, outdoor gear brand, REI, combated the commercialism of Black Friday by showing the stories and photos of customers who chose to #OptOutside instead of spending the day shopping.

Working your tone of voice into your organisation

The biggest hurdle to implementing a tone of voice is getting everyone involved.

Your organisation and writers need to first believe in your core values – yet another reason they must be a genuine representation of your company. Having these values in place gives you guidance for which content creators to hire, and helps you bring your current ones up to speed.

Go through examples of what hits the mark, and be thorough with editing and feedback at the beginning. Give each writer copies of the guidelines, make sure they understand what’s expected and check in with them to see how it’s going.

Your tone of voice should resound from every aspect of your business. It pulls together your team and creates stronger emotional bonds with your audience.

If you’re true to your values, tone of voice will follow, and copy will become easier to write. You’ll find that everything you create can be traced back to who you are as a company, and you’ll be attracting customers based on more than just the products you sell.

As a copywriting agency we offer a range of copywriting services - get in touch today to find out more.

 

Related SEO Copywriting blog posts:

How to Align your Content Strategy with your Business Goals.

The A-Z of content marketing and SEO jargon

How to Brief a Copywriter

See if you can get through the next four sentences without a touch of discomfort:

“We strive to adhere to the latest industry standards for each piece of expert content it produces for its clients. We’re always chuffed to chat about concocting content that will go the whole nine yards. From multilingual to complex industry copy, we are ideally equipped to meet your requirements. Because if content is king, you could say we’re its white horse – delivering the goods at the right time, and always in style.”

What you’ve just witnessed is different tones of voice overlapping in the same space.

Without a consistent tone of voice, not only is this copy cringe-worthy, it’s almost completely ineffective. In this article, we’ll cover how you can define and craft a tone of voice for your brand to avoid the same fate.

What is a business’ tone of voice?

Tone of voice is, quite simply, how you say something. In real-life, we give peoples’ tones of voice descriptions like ‘condescending’, ‘sarcastic’, or ‘serious’ and our perception of their tone sets the stall for our relationship with them.

This principle transfers to the business world, but instead of saying words aloud, you’re writing them down. All of your written communication – from your website and emails to your packaging and social media messages – should reflect it.

No brand is toneless, though some may mesh several tones and confuse everyone (as we saw above). Because your tone can define how your business is viewed by consumers, it’s critical to develop a consistent one.

Why is crafting a tone of voice important?

It’s cliche, but people hate change.

Any ripple in our expectations causes discomfort, even if it’s subconscious. This affects how customers engage with your brand.

You’d want all of your stationery, email signatures, advertisements, company kit and website pages to show the correct logo and company name. You also want your copy to appear as if it’s come from one source.

Giving your brand this uniform ‘voice’ conveys trustworthiness, honesty and stability – traits that we, as humans, adore.

Just as you may define a certain friend as ‘funny’, a colleague as ‘enthusiastic’, or your boss as ‘frank’, your customers will see your brand’s tone of voice as an expression of you.

Innocent Drinks, for example, has long been making waves for their casual, conversational tone… just check out this product description:

Likewise, Dollar Shave Club infuses a healthy dose of humour into an otherwise bland product (men’s razors) to differentiate themselves from competitors.

For customers, not only does this build trust, it gives them something to identify with. It proves you’re not just the products you sell, you’re a company with values that line up with theirs.

Think of it in reverse order: if they buy into your personality, they’re more likely to buy into your ideas and eventually your products.

How to discover and define your brand’s tone of voice

Pull back the layers of your business and defining a tone of voice takes three relatively simple steps.

 1. Outline your company values

Much like creating a mission statement, your tone of voice spawns directly from your company values.

First, you need to identify what those are. A good starting point is to pretend your business is a person you’re taking to a dinner party. Ask yourself what they would be like. Then, ask your team what they would be like.

From here, your values will start to take shape. While it sounds bizarre, human traits communicated as company values are what will set you apart – try to define three key ones.

Examples of three values from a few major companies:
Nikebold, simple, active
HSBC: traditional, professional, approachable
MailChimp: cheeky, fun, young

Be careful not to pick general terms like ‘intelligent’ for your IT company, as intelligence is standard across every IT company. Focus on the traits that make you different.

More importantly, don’t fake it ’til you make it. If your company is not humorous, forcing it to sound so will be… well, forced. Consumers can see through try-too-hard copy and, in the age of social media, won’t think twice about calling you out on it.

Your brand does not have to be relaxed like Innocent or funny like Dollar Shave Club to be heard and appreciated. Trying to copy what works for another brand leaves your own identity hollow, and makes producing every piece of content harder for you.

Instead, talk – with and listen to – your colleagues and even your customers about the company. The words you use and how you converse is already shaping your tone of voice, you just need to be able to put that in writing.

2. Transform those values into vocabulary

After you’ve defined your three key values, you need to make some rules about how they will be communicated in writing.

Use a spectrum to get an idea of where you want to sit. From humorous to serious, formal to casual, or inspirational to straightforward, this will clue your copywriters and content creators in on where their pieces should rest.

Keep in mind who you will be writing for. If it’s other businesses, you may want a professional-yet-approachable tone, whereas if you’re customer-facing you may desire a fun-and-exciting voice.

Then, decide on your actual vocabulary.

Complexity: Consider if terms like ‘altruistic’ and ‘amicable’ or simpler vocabulary would suit your audience’s reading level.

Humour: If you’re treading the fine line of a humorous style, make sure it comes across as such to people outside the company.

No-go terms: What will your brand absolutely not say? For instance, travel companies might avoid cliches like ‘crystal clear waters’ or ‘something for everyone’.

Colloquialisms and technical jargon: Defining something as cheap-as-chips might work for some, while it may be too casual for others. The same goes for confusing industry terminology (in general, unnecessary terms are better left out).

Nitty gritty grammar: More formal writing may stray away from starting sentences with ‘and’ or ‘but’. Meanwhile, relaxed styles may want to avoid stuffy terms like ‘whom’ and ‘amongst.’ Conjunctions are another consideration: does your brand prefer ‘they’re’ or ‘they are’, ‘it’s’ or ‘it is’?

Punctuation: In a list, will you separate the second and third options with the Oxford comma? Are exclamation points strictly off limits? Does the full stop go inside or outside quotation marks? What type of dash will you –use long em dashes, medium en dashes, or two hyphens together?

Swearing: If you plan to allow swearing as part of your brand’s voice like Dollar Shave Club did in the product description example at the start of this article, it needs to match your values. If you’d define your brand as ‘rebellious’, then it probably works for you. If you swing more toward ‘cheerful’, it’s better to stay away.

3. Learn to tell your story

When the small details have been hammered out, it’s time to look big picture. Storytelling allows you to present information to your customers that resonates with them on an emotional level. Stories also lead readers from one point to the next, so they won’t get lost in waves of ideas.

While not appropriate in every situation, you’ll be surprised at how frequently a story can replace mundane text.

History of your company is a good place to start. Instead of writing a bland background, give it some life by telling a compelling story about the founder’s journey.

Or, find ways to tell everyday stories. For example, GoPro highlights the videos and stories of its everyday users.

Or create a sub-culture around doing things differently. The American, outdoor gear brand, REI, combated the commercialism of Black Friday by showing the stories and photos of customers who chose to #OptOutside instead of spending the day shopping.

Working your tone of voice into your organisation

The biggest hurdle to implementing a tone of voice is getting everyone involved.

Your organisation and writers need to first believe in your core values – yet another reason they must be a genuine representation of your company. Having these values in place gives you guidance for which content creators to hire, and helps you bring your current ones up to speed.

Go through examples of what hits the mark, and be thorough with editing and feedback at the beginning. Give each writer copies of the guidelines, make sure they understand what’s expected and check in with them to see how it’s going.

Your tone of voice should resound from every aspect of your business. It pulls together your team and creates stronger emotional bonds with your audience.

If you’re true to your values, tone of voice will follow, and copy will become easier to write. You’ll find that everything you create can be traced back to who you are as a company, and you’ll be attracting customers based on more than just the products you sell.

As a copywriting agency we offer a range of copywriting services - get in touch today to find out more.

 

See if you can get through the next four sentences without a touch of discomfort:

“We strive to adhere to the latest industry standards for each piece of expert content it produces for its clients. We’re always chuffed to chat about concocting content that will go the whole nine yards. From multilingual to complex industry copy, we are ideally equipped to meet your requirements. Because if content is king, you could say we’re its white horse – delivering the goods at the right time, and always in style.”

What you’ve just witnessed is different tones of voice overlapping in the same space.

Without a consistent tone of voice, not only is this copy cringe-worthy, it’s almost completely ineffective. In this article, we’ll cover how you can define and craft a tone of voice for your brand to avoid the same fate.

What is a business’ tone of voice?

Tone of voice is, quite simply, how you say something. In real-life, we give peoples’ tones of voice descriptions like ‘condescending’, ‘sarcastic’, or ‘serious’ and our perception of their tone sets the stall for our relationship with them.

This principle transfers to the business world, but instead of saying words aloud, you’re writing them down. All of your written communication – from your website and emails to your packaging and social media messages – should reflect it.

No brand is toneless, though some may mesh several tones and confuse everyone (as we saw above). Because your tone can define how your business is viewed by consumers, it’s critical to develop a consistent one.

Why is crafting a tone of voice important?

It’s cliche, but people hate change.

Any ripple in our expectations causes discomfort, even if it’s subconscious. This affects how customers engage with your brand.

You’d want all of your stationery, email signatures, advertisements, company kit and website pages to show the correct logo and company name. You also want your copy to appear as if it’s come from one source.

Giving your brand this uniform ‘voice’ conveys trustworthiness, honesty and stability – traits that we, as humans, adore.

Just as you may define a certain friend as ‘funny’, a colleague as ‘enthusiastic’, or your boss as ‘frank’, your customers will see your brand’s tone of voice as an expression of you.

Innocent Drinks, for example, has long been making waves for their casual, conversational tone… just check out this product description:

Likewise, Dollar Shave Club infuses a healthy dose of humour into an otherwise bland product (men’s razors) to differentiate themselves from competitors.

For customers, not only does this build trust, it gives them something to identify with. It proves you’re not just the products you sell, you’re a company with values that line up with theirs.

Think of it in reverse order: if they buy into your personality, they’re more likely to buy into your ideas and eventually your products.

How to discover and define your brand’s tone of voice

Pull back the layers of your business and defining a tone of voice takes three relatively simple steps.

 1. Outline your company values

Much like creating a mission statement, your tone of voice spawns directly from your company values.

First, you need to identify what those are. A good starting point is to pretend your business is a person you’re taking to a dinner party. Ask yourself what they would be like. Then, ask your team what they would be like.

From here, your values will start to take shape. While it sounds bizarre, human traits communicated as company values are what will set you apart – try to define three key ones.

Examples of three values from a few major companies:
Nikebold, simple, active
HSBC: traditional, professional, approachable
MailChimp: cheeky, fun, young

Be careful not to pick general terms like ‘intelligent’ for your IT company, as intelligence is standard across every IT company. Focus on the traits that make you different.

More importantly, don’t fake it ’til you make it. If your company is not humorous, forcing it to sound so will be… well, forced. Consumers can see through try-too-hard copy and, in the age of social media, won’t think twice about calling you out on it.

Your brand does not have to be relaxed like Innocent or funny like Dollar Shave Club to be heard and appreciated. Trying to copy what works for another brand leaves your own identity hollow, and makes producing every piece of content harder for you.

Instead, talk – with and listen to – your colleagues and even your customers about the company. The words you use and how you converse is already shaping your tone of voice, you just need to be able to put that in writing.

2. Transform those values into vocabulary

After you’ve defined your three key values, you need to make some rules about how they will be communicated in writing.

Use a spectrum to get an idea of where you want to sit. From humorous to serious, formal to casual, or inspirational to straightforward, this will clue your copywriters and content creators in on where their pieces should rest.

Keep in mind who you will be writing for. If it’s other businesses, you may want a professional-yet-approachable tone, whereas if you’re customer-facing you may desire a fun-and-exciting voice.

Then, decide on your actual vocabulary.

Complexity: Consider if terms like ‘altruistic’ and ‘amicable’ or simpler vocabulary would suit your audience’s reading level.

Humour: If you’re treading the fine line of a humorous style, make sure it comes across as such to people outside the company.

No-go terms: What will your brand absolutely not say? For instance, travel companies might avoid cliches like ‘crystal clear waters’ or ‘something for everyone’.

Colloquialisms and technical jargon: Defining something as cheap-as-chips might work for some, while it may be too casual for others. The same goes for confusing industry terminology (in general, unnecessary terms are better left out).

Nitty gritty grammar: More formal writing may stray away from starting sentences with ‘and’ or ‘but’. Meanwhile, relaxed styles may want to avoid stuffy terms like ‘whom’ and ‘amongst.’ Conjunctions are another consideration: does your brand prefer ‘they’re’ or ‘they are’, ‘it’s’ or ‘it is’?

Punctuation: In a list, will you separate the second and third options with the Oxford comma? Are exclamation points strictly off limits? Does the full stop go inside or outside quotation marks? What type of dash will you –use long em dashes, medium en dashes, or two hyphens together?

Swearing: If you plan to allow swearing as part of your brand’s voice like Dollar Shave Club did in the product description example at the start of this article, it needs to match your values. If you’d define your brand as ‘rebellious’, then it probably works for you. If you swing more toward ‘cheerful’, it’s better to stay away.

3. Learn to tell your story

When the small details have been hammered out, it’s time to look big picture. Storytelling allows you to present information to your customers that resonates with them on an emotional level. Stories also lead readers from one point to the next, so they won’t get lost in waves of ideas.

While not appropriate in every situation, you’ll be surprised at how frequently a story can replace mundane text.

History of your company is a good place to start. Instead of writing a bland background, give it some life by telling a compelling story about the founder’s journey.

Or, find ways to tell everyday stories. For example, GoPro highlights the videos and stories of its everyday users.

Or create a sub-culture around doing things differently. The American, outdoor gear brand, REI, combated the commercialism of Black Friday by showing the stories and photos of customers who chose to #OptOutside instead of spending the day shopping.

Working your tone of voice into your organisation

The biggest hurdle to implementing a tone of voice is getting everyone involved.

Your organisation and writers need to first believe in your core values – yet another reason they must be a genuine representation of your company. Having these values in place gives you guidance for which content creators to hire, and helps you bring your current ones up to speed.

Go through examples of what hits the mark, and be thorough with editing and feedback at the beginning. Give each writer copies of the guidelines, make sure they understand what’s expected and check in with them to see how it’s going.

Your tone of voice should resound from every aspect of your business. It pulls together your team and creates stronger emotional bonds with your audience.

If you’re true to your values, tone of voice will follow, and copy will become easier to write. You’ll find that everything you create can be traced back to who you are as a company, and you’ll be attracting customers based on more than just the products you sell.

As a copywriting agency we offer a range of copywriting services - get in touch today to find out more.

 

Online product descriptions are one of the most important features of your e-commerce arsenal. They have the power to hook in prospective customers and answer any questions they might have, differentiate you from other companies selling the same or similar items, and they can bolster your SEO performance. Think of them as your digital salesperson, whose charm, knowledge and helpfulness might give potential customers the final push they need into purchasing.

Using generic, bland descriptions just doesn't cut it in today's competitive e-commerce marketplace, so follow our top tips on how to write the perfect product descriptions and see increased sales success.

Turn to the professionals for help

 

If you're short on time or resource, lack the experience in-house, or maybe just don't know where to start with your product-description writing, a copywriting agency can help. Writing persuasive descriptions designed to sell the product benefits and drive people to purchase will be second nature to their staff. Plus they'll have years of experience across multiple sectors, giving them the ability to get under the skin of your customers with wording that's memorable and compelling.

Know who you're writing for

If you're tackling product descriptions yourself, put yourself in your customers' shoes. Who are they? What are they looking for? How can your description help them, enlighten them and persuade them to buy? Try working with your colleagues and using your customer data to develop personas of your customer base. This will help you tailor your product content so it resonates with the people who matter most to your business. 71% of companies who outperform their revenue and lead goals have documented personas, so it's a great place to start.

Do not duplicate your descriptions

Duplicate question marks

If you use duplicated or similar product descriptions on your website, search engines will not be happy when they come to index your website. It can confuse them and disrupt your rankings. Make sure that both descriptions and product titles are different for every product you sell. If you've got lots of products and not much time to write unique descriptions, you can add a no-index tag to your page to tell the search engines to skip the content for now.

Include just the right number of keywords

Including keywords in your product description is important, especially for search engines. When your prospective customers search online for your products, you need your pages to rise up against your competitors with high rankings. Avoid keyword stuffing in the body copy but be sure to include any keywords in your page title, headlines and sub-headings. Getting your on-page SEO right can be easy to accomplish, and it's well worth investing the time and effort into doing so.

Do not underestimate the power of your product descriptions. As you can see from these top tips, they can be your key to converting customers and increasing your search-engine visibility, helping grow your brand awareness and prospective customer base. They might seem a simple, throwaway feature of your product landing pages, but the more you refine and perfect them, the higher your sale conversion rates will be.

Get in touch with WooContent today to find out how we can support you with writing the perfect product description. 

 

Content marketing is here to stay – it’s a proven strategy used by the world’s most successful marketing teams. Despite this, proving the value of your content to your bosses and peers is another task entirely. In theory, measuring the return of your content strategy sounds straightforward. You probably already have an idea whether it’s working or not. But how do you measure return on investment (ROI) in practice? Here are some of the best way of doing so.

Calculating ROI

In plain terms, to calculate ROI, subtract the spend from the return, then divide the return by the amount spent – in this example, our return is £20,000 and our spend is £10,000:

(£20,000 – £10,000) / £10,000 = 1.00

ROI = current value of investment minus cost of investment divided by cost of investment.

This will give you a decimal that can be expressed as a percentage (in this case, 100%). You’ll already know this but if it’s a positive number, well done, your activity drove more money than you spent. If it’s negative, it probably wasn’t worth the effort.

The underlying stats

The actual formula for ROI is relatively straightforward. Adding up how much you spend should also be simple, providing you have kept accurate records. Add up everything from time spent, salaries paid, agency fees, media spend, design costs and anything else you can think of for the most accurate reflection.

The most difficult part with content marketing is putting a figure on the return.

Lead generation

Identifying the return is easier for some types of content over others. If your content is behind a lead-generation form that requires users to enter their details before accessing the file, you’re in luck. Evaluating the amount of business it drove is as simple as matching the lead value to the downloads. It may be worth doing this with potential lead value (whether it was won or lost) and actual sales value. This way, you can prove the worth of your content – it’s up to the sales team to close the lead.

You can see this method in action with Hubspot’s Complete Collection of Content Creation Templates. If you want to download them, you have to tell Hubspot who you are, and you can bet they’ll get in contact afterwards. If your lead-generation form is connected to your customer database – like Hubspot’s will be – then this process is even more simple.

Alternative ways of evaluating return

For other types of content, it’s less straightforward. Blogs, videos, articles, guest posts, infographics, case studies and other pieces of content will all contribute to sales in various ways without getting that final conversion. To find the ROI for these, you’ll have to be more creative as there are many methods:

Attribution models in Google Analytics

There are many ways of attributing the value of sales you have made to the marketing efforts that drove them. It’s a complex journey, because users move between channels over a significant period of time before they make their purchase.

Google Analytics is a great free tool that is helpful when evaluating the return of content. Its Page Value metric puts a financial figure against each page based on the contribution it makes to sales. The higher the number, the higher the value.

The tool also allows you to look at your marketing performance using different attribution models, providing you have e-commerce tracking set up. There are the standard models: first click, last click, time decay and linear. There is also the option to create a custom model. It’s worth looking at your content using different models to see how and where it contributes, so you can optimise it.

Start simply

Evaluating the return from content marketing can be as complicated or simple as you like. Our advice is to start off small and grow from there. It’s better to have a baseline figure that everyone understands and gives you a starting point rather than spending time and energy on a more accurate figure that probably isn’t worth the effort. Once you’re confident, you can move towards an ROI value that is accurate and actionable.

Get in touch with WooContent today to discover how as a copywriting agency we can support your content marketing strategy.

 

Learning how to respond to complaint letters is an art form in itself. You’ve got to be courteous, empathetic, apologetic and above all remember that the customer is always right.

But some PR and Marketing companies have taken it to a whole new level, with their hilarious replies that only strengthen and grow their branding.

It’s rare in today’s world to be sent a concrete letter of complaint, what’s more likely is that social media will be the platform, and you’ll be tweeted or sent a negative Facebook post. Let’s see how some of the world’s top companies respond to criticism.

Tesco

best complaint letters copywriting services

Two unhappy St. Andrews customers brought the lack of Butterkist Popcorn on their Tesco shelves to the attention of the store by sending a politely worded poem. Tesco could have easily responded, saying they were sorry for the inconvenience and left it at that, but instead, they decided to write their own apology poem.

best complaint letters copywriting services

In it they let the two ladies know which stores nearby will be selling their beloved popcorn, and as a gesture of goodwill, sent a £10 gift card so they could purchase some for free. Amazingly both poems were mailed in hard copy form, but they quickly went viral when the photos were posted online. Tesco handled this complaint in good humour, perhaps knowing it had the potential to go big on social. They also did everything they could to make sure these women continued to be Tesco shoppers.

Argos

This tweet by Immy ‘BADMAN’ Bugti epitomises what a 21st-century complaint letter consists of.

best complaint letters copywriting services

His grammar, or lack thereof, inspired Argos to use the same lingo in their reply. Not only does Argos let them know when the next available stock will be in, but they also apologise for their employee’s attitude all in a hilarious and banter-riddled way. BADMAN’s response? He simply tweets back, ‘respect. Sick guy.’ Argos has kept their shopper happy and helped to boost their branding by letting other potential customers know they’ve got a fun, quirky side and are all about exceptional service.

Sainsbury’s

best complaint letters copywriting services
best complaint letters copywriting services

This tongue-in-cheek Facebook post unsurprisingly went viral very quickly. Sainsbury’s customer Leila Jayne Daly complains that she has found a worm in her salad, which caused her so much distress she instead ate a burger and quickly gained 12 stone. The alleged worm incident also forced her to walk the streets for money, and she wants Sainsbury’s to take responsibility for her crumbling life by closing their doors and firing all staff.

Obviously poking fun at over-dramatic complaint letters, Leila makes her point while gaining the attention of thousands of Sainsbury’s facebook followers. Sainsbury’s took her complaint in their stride, replying with comments on all aspects of her woeful tale and suggest she turns to salad-making as a new career. Joking aside, Sainsbury’s stepped up to the plate and offered her a refund on her salad, as well as giving her a gift card so she can purchase a little something extra for herself. The response given by Sainsbury’s highlights how effective social media can be in marketing and PR. The company’s reply was ‘liked’ over 19,000 times and shows that Sainsbury’s can be a good sport and listen to the customer.

best complaint letters copywriting services

JetBlue

Esaí Vélez@EvpLares14

@JetBlue just my Tv 🙁 ! The ones I saw next to me, everything was working.

JetBlue Airways

@JetBlue

@EvpLares14 We always hate it when that happens. Send us a DM with your confirmation code to get you a credit for the non-working TV.

See JetBlue Airways's other Tweets

When Esai Velez booked his four-hour flight with JetBlue he probably didn’t expect the TV not to work for the duration. Thanks to social media Velez didn’t need to send a lengthy complaint letter, instead, he simply tweeted the airline directly. JetBlue quickly responded asking for more information and then replied with empathy, and of course an offer for Velez to receive credit for his next flight with them.

They had the whole issue dealt with in just 23 minutes, leading to a further tweet from Velez showing his gratitude. JetBlue’s response and customer service is the perfect example of how to reply to complaintsm while still retaining your fan base and building confidence in your brand. It also ensures that the consumer won’t be going to your competitor any time soon.

It may be tempting to retaliate if you get a negative review or complaint letter, but rising above, apologising and giving a helpful response is the best way forward. Responding in a positive and non-passive-aggressive tone is key to making sure you keep your customers happy, and that they continue to support your brand. It’s also a very smart way of turning something negative into good PR and an excellent opportunity to build your brand image, all by showing how well you can respond to adversity.

There will always be complaint letters, whether it’s via social media, email or direct written correspondence. But it’s the way companies reply that sets them apart in the industry and makes or breaks their customer following. Of course, it also helps if you add a little humour to your response.

To find out how our copywriting agency can give your digital marketing a boost, get in touch with us today as we can enhance your content with our copywriting services

 

We’ve all experienced how some of the big household names in charity use hard-hitting subject matters and psychology to grab our attention.

In fact, as of September 2017 there were over 167,000 charities in the UK, each wanting to get their voices heard.

We explore charity copywriting methods including active voice, building connections and powerful call to actions (CTAs) in order to convert readers to donators. And, how excellent copywriting can inform and even save lives, while at the same time nudging readers towards allegiance with the charity and raising money.

How UNICEF leveraged its social influence

In 2013, the Swedish branch of UNICEF used a somewhat controversial message to encourage its large social media following to take action and donate. Its ‘Likes don’t save lives’ campaign highlighted the rise of ‘slacktivism’, saying ‘Like us on Facebook, and we will vaccinate zero children against polio.’

As well as these adverts, four video ads were also distributed through social media. One of the most powerful was a direct address to the camera from a 10-year-old orphan. The clever copywriting in the script used a sarcastic tone to get people thinking, with the boy saying:

“Sometimes I worry that I will get sick, like my mom got sick. But I think everything will be alright. Today, Unicef Sweden has 177,000 likes on Facebook.”

The result of UNICEF’s application of impactful psychological wording was a huge increase in donations. In fact the money raised was enough to vaccinate 637,324 people against polio. Likes alone can’t fund UNICEF’s work, but leveraging those likes with smart copywriting can.

Oxfam asks the underdogs to work together

The tagline of Oxfam’s ‘Even it up’ advert portrays an injustice that the everyday person can relate to, brought in the form of a heavyweight statistic:

‘The world’s 85 richest people own the same wealth as the 3.5 billion poorest people.’

This statistic draws on the readers’ knowledge of the wealth disparity in the UK – much touted in the press – while also putting it into perspective. That’s because the image portrays a child in a third world country wearing whatever clothes he can find, who is far worse off than the average Brit.

Readers are encouraged to visit Oxfam’s website through use of the inclusive wording ‘together, we can end extreme equality’ and ‘join us at www.oxfam.org.uk/even’. Once there, you’re asked to sign a petition that’ll be sent to world leaders, through the use of further astute copywriting.

After explaining Oxfam’s belief ‘that everyone should have a fair say, pay their fair share of tax, have equal access to good healthcare and education, and decent wages.’ The final CTA is a question that again signifies working together and implies that everyone else will be signing the petition: ‘The world is ready to act, are you? It’s time to Even it up!’

RNLI – saving lives and increasing engagement

For the fourth year of the RNLI’s ‘Respect the Water’ national drowning prevention campaign, the charity has launched cinema and radio ads, as well as cleverly worded and laid-out social ads that engage on a number of levels.

One of the slogans used in RNLI’s social media ads is:

‘Extend your arms, legs and life expectancy’

This succinctly and directly explains what to do if you fall in cold water. The wording shows how a simple action has a profound effect.

RNLI

@RNLI

Extend your arms, legs and life expectancy.

View image on Twitter
87 people are talking about this

Another tweet uses the acronym F.L.O.A.T. to give full instruction on what to do, in an easy to remember way.

RNLI

@RNLI

Fight your instinct and F.L.O.A.T to live.

View image on Twitter
70 people are talking about this

Using the overarching message ‘Float to live’, the copywriting primarily has the aim of informing and saving lives, rather than actively encouraging donations. However the ads promote understanding of the good work that the RNLI does, encourage social engagement through the hashtag #RespectTheWater and direct people to their website, where they can learn more and potentially donate.

The Respect The Water webpages contain videos, challenges and expert opinion, ending in the CTA ‘hear about our lifesaving work, keep in touch’. And when people hit keep in touch the orange donate button is looming in the top right.

Leaving legacies to The Donkey Sanctuary

In 2013 The Guardian released data on the top 1,000 charities in the UK ranked by donations received; and there were some surprising rankings. In fact, the Donkey Sanctuary received more donations than The Samaritans, which was due in large part to legacies.

So we took a look at the legacy pages on their website to see how they were encouraging people to leave money to the charity in their wills. Leaving a legacy is one of the four main ways of giving to The Donkey Sanctuary provided on their ‘ways to help’ page, in addition to various forms of donation. Incidentally, we also liked the way that the section was called ‘ways to help’, which is a far less pushy title than simply ‘donate’.

Headed with the words ‘Leave a lasting gift’, the main legacy page encourages action in a traditionally effective way – by flattering readers. It says:

So here’s to those who change the world.

The selfless devoted ones, the compassionate ones, those whose conviction protects the abused, the overworked, the unwanted and unloved.

The CTA on this page is a very direct ‘email us’, which works due to the effectiveness of the other pages in the legacy section, such as a ‘How to leave a legacy’ information page and a testimonial from a benefactor. The content on these pages allows the reader to make a firm decision about leaving a legacy while on the website.

 

As well as showing that others are leaving legacies to the Donkey Sanctuary, and thus encouraging donation through a feeling of inclusion, the wording on this testimonial page highlights that legacies of any amount are gratefully received:

I’ve decided to leave The Donkey Sanctuary a bequest in my Will. My family will come first, but then I’m planning to leave what’s left to charity.

However small my contribution, I am made to feel that ‘every little bit helps’.

It’s clear that charities can use a number of tactics such as using a financial copywriter to encourage people to donate. Knowing the way your potential supporters feel and how to persuade them to get involved is key in creating effective copywriting for charities.

As a copywriting agency, WooContent can offer advice on charity copywriting that leads to support, so get in touch today to find out more.

 

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