Fashion

For decades magazines have played a crucial role in the fashion industry, with the launch of popular publications like Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar dating as far back as the 19th century. For brands and fashion houses, the ability to appear in front of fashion-conscious audiences is a vital marketing opportunity; it gives them a chance to show their products in aspirational settings that customers will want to imitate. With 30% of shoppers now choosing to research clothing online prior to making a purchase, the role of digital media within the fashion industry is of increasing significance. In an increasingly digital era, the allure of fashion magazines shows no sign of abating. We’ve seen some inspirational examples of fashion content marketing in recent years, with more and more brands opting to create bespoke content that meets the specific needs of their audience. Online retailers ASOS and Net-A-Porter have even launched their own print magazines (although both are available...

The fashion industry is never predictable — shock and awe reign supreme when it comes to revealing each season’s latest collections. Once, fashion was an industry built on hierarchies – with the designer as oligarch. Recently though, it has had to adapt to advances in technology that have seen much greater power placed with the consumer. This ethos harks back to the days of punk fashion (of which Vienne Westwood was – and still is – a pioneer) where it was a much more democratic process. Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat are just a few of the social media platforms that have contributed to this shift. It seems fitting then, that September’s London Fashion Week (LFW) took place in a Soho car park and not in its usual grander setting of the neo-classical Somerset House. With this in mind then, we take a look at this year’s Technology Trendsetters… Bigger, better and bolder Brands are constantly looking...

Independence Day is a great opportunity to jump on the USA nationalism spirit bandwagon, posting pictures of fireworks displays and star spangled banners. How not to do this was perfectly exemplified by American Apparel, the headline hitting clothing company out of LA, when they posted a picture of supposed clouds on Tumblr over the weekend. The image was not of clouds, but of the aftermath of the Challenger explosion from 1986. The company issued an apology blaming a young worker who was born after the tragedy that claimed 7 lives, after deleting the post. This is not the first time that the company has been in the news, with multiple sexual harassment lawsuits brought against the now ex-president, Dov Charney. The board of directors recently voted to oust him from his post, but he claims to be fighting back, something that many investors are keen to avoid. Charney has, however, been a...

As the marketing world as a whole gets increasingly fascinated by the possibilities of content marketing, the fashion industry can justifiably say they were way ahead of the curve. If any sector should be studied as a great example of how content has been used incredibly smartly to build brands, develop a social presence and acquire search traffic, fashion content marketing is it. With over 80% of companies who blog on a daily basis now quoting a positive ROI for their inbound marketing, fashion brands have been at the forefront of blogging, posting great social content and encouraging rampant sharing of their content. Of course, fashion brands have fantastically visual products, normally modelled by striking individuals, all of which helps in terms of making their content look brilliant, but there is still much to learn from how they create engagement and conversation amongst peer groups. Here are our 5 favourite examples of great...